Lync and OCS Administration Tools

A quick post with 5 key reminders about administering OCS and Lync in a coexistence scenario. As with previous OCS/Lync releases, the general rule is that you must use the administrative tools that ship with the server version that you want to manage.

1. The Lync Server Administration Tools Cannot be Installed Alongside the OCS 2007 or OCS 2007 R2 Tools.

If you try to install the Lync Administrative Tools on a machine that already as the OCS 2007 R2 Administrative Tools, you will see the following error:

Lync Admin Tool Install

Note: if you want to by-pass the Lync Deployment Wizard GUI to install the Administrative tools directly from the setup files, this worked for me:
1. First install the core components from:  .. \Lync Server 2010 Eval (US)\Setup\amd64\Setup\ocscore.msi
2. Next, install the administrative tools from: ..\Lync Server 2010 Eval (US)\Setup\amd64\Setup\admintools.msi.

Note: if you want to by-pass the Lync Deployment Wizard GUI to install the Administrative tools directly from the setup files, this worked for me:

  • First install the core components from:  .. \Setup\amd64\Setup\ocscore.msi
  • Next, install the administrative tools from: ..\Setup\amd64\Setup\admintools.msi.

2. You can View your OCS 2007 R2 Topology in the Lync Topology Builder

A key step in the the OCS migration process is to merge topology information. This merges data from a previous OCS 2007 or OCS 2007 R2 topology data into the Lync Central Management Store. See Microsoft TechNet Lync Server Migration (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg425746.aspx) for full migration details. This is a key step to allow side-by-side coexistence and user migration.

The “Merge 2007 or 2007 R2 Topology…” action from the Topology builder (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg398172.aspx) creates a root tree node named “BackCompatSite” which shows up in the Lync Topology Builder where you can view your OCS Topology components.  The OCS information under this node is just read-only; no actions can be taken.

Lync OCS Topology

Important Notes:

  • Always save a copy of your existing Lync topology first.
  • Before you merge the topology, you need to install the “WMI Backward Compatibility Package”.  This compatibility package is located in the Lync distribution at:
    • …\Setup\amd64\Setup\OCSWMIBC.msi
  • The “BackCompatSite” OCS tree node is a snapshot of your legacy OCS environment – it does not keep it synchronized! If you makes changes, you will need to remerge.

3.  The OCS WMI Classes can be Installed on a Lync Server Admin Machine and can be Used with PowerShell

The WMI Backward Compatibility Package (OCSWMIBC.msi) can be installed on any machine in the domain that has the Lync Server 2010 Core Components and Lync Server Management Shell installed, and has access to the Office Communications Server 2007 R2 topology (WMI provider to Active Directory and SQL Server). OCSWMIBC.msi is typically installed on a Front-End server in the topology.
You can then use PowerShell to query information about your OCS environement, such as:
  • Get-wmiobject -class msft_sipesusersetting | Select-Object DisplayName, Enabled (to see user information)
  • Get-WmiObject -class MSFT_SIPLocalNormalizationRuleData”   (to see your OCS normalization rules)
  • Get-WmiObject -class MSFT_SIPLocationProfileData | Select-Object -Property Name   (to see your OCS location profiles)
  • Get-WmiObject -class MSFT_SIPTrustedServiceSetting | Select-Object FQDN, Port (to see your OCS servers and services)
Do not use the WMI classes to change anything in your OCS environment – use the respective OCS Administrative Tools for that.
Again, the WMI Backward Compatibility Package is available on your distribution media at: …\Setup\amd64\Setup\OCSWMIBC.msi.

4. There is only a 64-bit Version of the Lync Server Administrative Tools

There is only a 64-bit version of the Lync Administrative tools currently available. There are a couple of options:
  • You can use the web-based Lync Server 2010 Control Panel (from any computer running IE 7, IE 8, or Firefox 3+), but having administrative access via PowerShell will allow you to do more powerful custom administration – specifically Topology related administration.
  • It is possible to launch a remote PowerShell 2.0 remote session on a 32-bit machine to the Lync server, load the Lync Server Management module, and use the Lync PowerShell cmdlets if you are in a pinch. For more information on this see my blog post: Microsoft Lync Remote PowerShell Administration.

5. There is no Active Directory Users and Computers Add-In for Lync Server

Lync user management should be done through the Lync Control Panel Administration tool.  As usual, the non-Lync user Active Directory attributes can be managed through ADUC.
Tip: If you are trying to enable an AD user for Lync, and get the error: “Insufficient access rights to perform the operation“, see the following:
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6 comments to Lync and OCS Administration Tools

  • Just catching up after a vacation…

    I have looked into, and used, Point #4 many times. Launching a remote PowerShell session from a 32-bit O/S is possible. On older 32-bit O/S’s I have hit the odd issue. I documented them here in a blog post for you and others:

    Microsoft Lync Remote PowerShell Administration (http://blog.insidelync.com/2011/08/remote-lync-powershell-administration/).

    Cheers,
    Curtis

  • Harold Hare

    Yes, we are in a bind. We have only a venerable Windoze 2003 server (32bit) with 32bit Powershell 2.0 installed available to access the new Lync 2010 server.

    How far have you looked into point 4… “There is only a 64-bit version of the Lync Administrative tools currently available. I have not tried a 32-bit remote powershell session to a 64-bit Lync server. It should be possible to launch a remote PowerShell 2.0 remote session on a 32-bit machine to the Lync server, load the Lync Server Management module, and use the Lync PowerShell cmdlets if you are in a pinch. Stay tuned.”

    A quick test gave me SSL related issues when attempting to connect remotely.

  • Hi,
    You should be able to get your 3rd party app to work by on a 32-bit machine by establishing a remote powershell 2.0 session from a 32-bit machine and remotely run the Lync PowerShell cmdlet’s.

    The OCSCore that shipped with OCS 2007 R2 does not have the ability to connect to Lync – it installs WMI classes that are no longer supported in Lync, and it does not contain the new Lync PowerShell cmdlet’s.

    Curtis

  • Tristan Leask

    So I guess that if you use the OCS Core components as part of a 3rd party app that talks to the Lync server, you are screwed if you want to run your 3rd party app on a 32bit machine then being that the OCSCore is for 64bit only.

    The OCSCore shipped with 2007 R2 does the job, but you are not allow to redistribute that file, so unless the user has both media, they will not be able to get your 3rd part app to work.

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